Record: 1
57210921464409620011201
Title: Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in the treatment of neurological patients with urinary symptoms.
Subject(s): TRANSCUTANEOUS electrical nerve stimulation; URINARY organs -- Diseases -- Treatment; ENDORPHINS
Source: BJU International, Dec2001, Vol. 88 Issue 9, p899, 10p, 4 charts
Author(s): Skeil, D.; Thorpe, A.C.
Abstract: Examines the transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in the treatment of neurological patients with urinary symptoms. Effect of TENS application on urodynamic data; Reflection from the inadequacy of impact on quality-of-life measures; Increase in the level of cerebrospinal endorphins at various frequencies.
AN: 5721092
ISSN: 1464-4096
Database: Academic Search Premier


Record: 2
Title: [beta-Endorphin in the blood plasma and cerebrospinal fluid--a marker of analgesic efficacy in acute postoperative and chronic pain in cancer patients]
Transliterated Title: beta-Endorfin v plazme krovi i spinnomozgovoĭ zhidkosti--marker éffektivnosti obezbolivaniia pri ostroĭ posleoperatsionnoĭ i khronicheskoĭ boliakh u onkologicheskikh bol'nykh.
Author(s): Pavlova ZV; Laktionov KP; Isakova ME; Kushlinskiĭ NE
Source: Anesteziologiia i reanimatologiia [Anesteziol Reanimatol] 2000 Mar-Apr (2), pp. 14-7.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Russian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: RUSSIA NLM ID: 7705399 ISSN: 0201-7563
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Analgesia, Epidural*/methods
Analgesia, Epidural*/statistics & numerical data
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*/methods
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*/statistics & numerical data
Neoplasms/*therapy
Pain, Intractable/*therapy
Pain, Postoperative/*therapy
beta-Endorphin/*analysis

Acute Disease. Analgesics, Opioid. Analysis of Variance. Biological Markers/analysis. Comparative Study. Human. Morphine. Neoplasms/metabolism. Pain, Intractable/metabolism. Pain, Postoperative/metabolism. Time Factors.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Analgesics, Opioid)
0 (Biological Markers)
57-27-2 (Morphine)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 20000808 Date Completed: 20000808
Citation ID(s): PMID: 10833828 Medline UI: 20293738
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 3
Title: Peripheral beta-endorphin in rheumatoid arthritis.
Author(s): Bender T; Barna I
Source: Scandinavian journal of rheumatology [Scand J Rheumatol] 1998; 27 (3), pp. 236.
Pub. Type: Comment; Letter
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: NORWAY NLM ID: 0321213 ISSN: 0300-9742
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Arthritis, Rheumatoid/*blood
Osteoarthritis/*blood
beta-Endorphin/*blood

Acupuncture Therapy. Arthritis, Rheumatoid/therapy. Corticotropin/blood. Electric Stimulation Therapy. Human. Osteoarthritis/therapy. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation.
Comments: Comment on: Scand J Rheumatol. 1997;26(2):88-91. (PMID: 9137321)
CAS Registry No.: 60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
9002-60-2 (Corticotropin)
Revision Date: 20011126
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19980707 Date Completed: 19980707
Citation ID(s): PMID: 9645422 Medline UI: 98307329
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 4
97051235660149069919961101
Title: Pain-free fillings?
Subject(s): TRANSCUTANEOUS electrical nerve stimulation; DENTAL care
Source: Self, Nov96, Vol. 18 Issue 11, p90, 3/4p, 1c
Author(s): Hochwald, Lambeth
Abstract: Focuses on electronic anesthesia, an alternative to Novocain injections in dental care. Description of the system; Effect of interfering with pain transmission and triggering endorphin release; Possibility that the method will replace traditional anesthesia.
AN: 9705123566
ISSN: 0149-0699
Database: MasterFILE Premier


Record: 5
Title: Physiological and therapeutic effects of high frequency electrical pulses.
Author(s): Liss S; Liss B
Author's Address: MEDI Consultants, Inc., Paterson, New Jersey 07504, USA.
Source: Integrative physiological and behavioral science : the official journal of the Pavlovian Society [Integr Physiol Behav Sci] 1996 Apr-Jun; 31 (2), pp. 88-95.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 9105843 ISSN: 1053-881X
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation*/instrumentation
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Brain/*physiology

Adult. Aged. Brain Chemistry/physiology. Circadian Rhythm. Female. Hormones/cerebrospinal fluid. Human. Male. Mental Disorders/therapy. Middle Age. Neurotransmitters/cerebrospinal fluid. Pain/therapy. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation.
Abstract: The results of stimulating human subjects with the LISS Cranial Stimulator (LCS) and the LISS Body Stimulator (LBS) include an increase or decrease in the activities of certain neurotransmitters and neurohormones and the reduction of associated pain, insomnia, depression, and spasticity. The effects were documented in human subjects with measurements of the serum concentration of the various agents and assessments of the symptoms being performed before and after stimulation. The stimulators had a carrier frequency of 15,000 hz, which utilizes the bulk capacitance of the body, and a 15 hz modulating bioactive frequency. The second modulating frequency presently used, 500 hz, reduces the energy input to the patient by half. Significant increases in levels of CSF serotonin and beta endorphin were recorded post stimulation. There were also elevations in the levels of plasma serotonin, beta endorphin, GABA and DHEA together with diminished levels of cortisol and tryptophan. Concomitant with these changes were significant improvements in the symptoms of pain, insomnia, spasticity, depression, and headache.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Hormones)
0 (Neurotransmitters)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19961206 Date Completed: 19961206
Citation ID(s): PMID: 8809593 Medline UI: 96405453
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 6
Title: [Stimulation of the endorphin structures of the brain--a new nondrug treatment method]
Transliterated Title: Stimuliatsiia éndorfinnykh struktur mozga--novyĭ nemedikamentoznyĭ sposob lecheniia.
Author(s): Aleksandrova VA; Lebedev VP; Rychkova SV
Source: Zhurnal nevropatologii i psikhiatrii imeni S.S. Korsakova [Zh Nevropatol Psikhiatr Im S S Korsakova] 1996; 96 (2), pp. 101-4.
Pub. Type: Journal Article; Review; Review, Tutorial
Language: Russian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: RUSSIA NLM ID: 8710066 ISSN: 0044-4588
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Brain/*secretion
Receptors, Opioid/*physiology
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation/*methods

Animal. Endorphins/cerebrospinal fluid. Endorphins/secretion. Human. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation/instrumentation.
No. of References: 65
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
0 (Receptors, Opioid)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19961031 Date Completed: 19961031
Citation ID(s): PMID: 8754356 Medline UI: 96333057
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 7
Title: [Evaluation of the effectiveness of transcutaneous electroneuroanalgesia in phantom pain syndrome]
Transliterated Title: Issledovanie éffektivnosti chreskozhnoĭ élektroneĭroanalgezii pri fantomnom bolevom sindrome.
Author(s): Gnezdilov AV; Syrovegin AV; Plaksin SE; Ovechkin AM; Ivanov AM; Sul'timov SA
Source: Anesteziologiia i reanimatologiia [Anesteziol Reanimatol] 1995 Mar-Apr (2), pp. 97-102.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Russian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: RUSSIA NLM ID: 7705399 ISSN: 0201-7563
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Phantom Limb/*therapy

Alpha Rhythm. Brain/physiopathology. Comparative Study. Electroencephalography. Endorphins/blood. English Abstract. Evaluation Studies. Human. Phantom Limb/blood. Phantom Limb/physiopathology. Syndrome.
Abstract: Transcutaneous electroneurostimulation carried out in 24 patients with phantom pain syndrome completely relieved pain in only 25% of patients. A possible cause of poor efficacy of this method is depletion of the endorphin antinociceptive mechanisms. EEG findings indicated a possibility of objectively controlling the course of analgesia. Specific EEG signs of phantom pain syndrome were distinguished: polymorphism of EEG fluctuations, high-frequency rapid or slow electrical activity of the brain, and paroxysmal activity. Normalization of EEG, i.e. appearance of manifest alpha-rhythm, reduction of the intensities of slow-wave and rapid activities with the relevant spectral changes, are signs of a positive effect of the analgesic method used, as exemplified by transcutaneous electroneurostimulation.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19950915 Date Completed: 19950915
Citation ID(s): PMID: 7645788 Medline UI: 95373746
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 8
Title: Pain relief can reduce hypoxemia in distressed neonates during routine treatment procedures.
Author(s): Pokela ML
Author's Address: Department of Paediatrics, University of Oulu, Finland.
Source: Pediatrics [Pediatrics] 1994 Mar; 93 (3), pp. 379-83.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 0376422 ISSN: 0031-4005
Citation Subsets: AIM; IM
MeSH Heading: Anoxemia/*prevention & control
Meperidine/*therapeutic use
Pain/*drug therapy

Human. Hydrocortisone/blood. Infant Care. Infant, Newborn. Oxygen/blood. Pain/etiology. Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood. Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy. Stress/etiology. Stress/prevention & control. Suction/adverse effects. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. beta-Endorphin/blood.
Abstract: OBJECTIVE. To determine whether the use of opioids could reduce the hypoxemia and hemodynamic instability associated with routine intensive care procedures in neonates with respiratory distress. DESIGN. Randomized and placebo-controlled study. METHODS. Physiological, plasma beta-endorphin, cortisol, and glucose responses to routine treatment procedures were studied in 84 mechanically ventilated distressed neonates randomized into groups receiving 1 mg/kg meperidine or 0.9% saline 15 minutes before tracheal suction or routine nursing care. RESULTS. The duration of hypoxemia (transcutaneous partial pressure of O2 < 6.6 kPa (< 50 mm Hg) and/or arterial blood oxygen saturation < 80%) during treatment procedures was significantly longer in the saline group (mean 82 vs 36 seconds, P = .001) and distress quantified by a novel behavioral scoring method was much higher. Changes in arterial blood pressure, heart rate, or plasma beta-endorphin, cortisol, and glucose concentration did not show any statistically significant differences between the groups. CONCLUSION. Newborns with respiratory difficulties often suffer from hypoxemia during essential treatment procedures. The use of opioid analgesia may reduce the duration of hypoxemia and the associated distress and, therefore, may improve the long-term results of neonatal intensive care.
CAS Registry No.: 50-23-7 (Hydrocortisone)
57-42-1 (Meperidine)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
7782-44-7 (Oxygen)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19940331 Date Completed: 19940331
Citation ID(s): PMID: 8115195 Medline UI: 94159393
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 9
Title: Effects of acupuncture and transcutaneous stimulation analgesia on plasma hormone levels during and after major abdominal surgery.
Author(s): Kho HG; Kloppenborg PW; van Egmond J
Author's Address: Institute for Anesthesiology, University of Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Source: European journal of anaesthesiology [Eur J Anaesthesiol] 1993 May; 10 (3), pp. 197-208.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: ENGLAND NLM ID: 8411711 ISSN: 0265-0215
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Acupuncture Analgesia*
Lymph Node Excision*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Abdomen/*surgery
Catecholamines/*blood
Hydrocortisone/*blood
Pituitary Hormones/*blood

Adult. Anesthesia, Intravenous. Blood Pressure. Corticotropin/blood. Epinephrine/blood. Fentanyl. Heart Rate. Human. Male. Norepinephrine/blood. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. Vasopressins/blood. beta-Endorphin/blood.
Abstract: The effects of acupuncture and transcutaneous electrical stimulation (TES) on plasma adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA), adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), beta-endorphin (beta E), anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) and hydrocortisone (cortisol) were evaluated during and, for four days after surgery in 42 male patients submitted to a standardized major abdominal operation in a comparative study of three different anaesthetic techniques. Group 1 received acupuncture and transcutaneous stimulation as the main non-pharmacological analgesic during surgery. Group 2 received moderate-dose fentanyl (initial bolus of 10 micrograms kg-1 followed by continuous infusion of 5 micrograms kg-1 h-1 for the first hour, and then 4 micrograms kg-1 h-1. Group 3 received a combination of both methods. In all three groups analgesia was supplemented, if necessary, by small bolus injections of 50 micrograms fentanyl. Anaesthesia was induced in all groups with thiopentone 5 mg kg-1 and vecuronium 0.1 mg kg-1 and patients were ventilated (N2O:O2 = 2:1) to achieve normocapnia without the use of a halogenated agent. Pre-operatively acupuncture plus TES in Groups 1 and 3 led to a rise in beta E (P < 0.05) without changes of haemodynamics. After intubation beta E did not increase further. Intubation in Group 2 led to an increase of beta E (P < 0.05) also, and to a rise in pulse rate and blood pressure (P < 0.05) in all three groups. Per-operatively acupuncture plus TES in Group 1 showed a response of circulating NA and cortisol similar to that in Groups 2 and 3, whereas the responses of the circulating A, ACTH, beta E and ADH in Group 1 were more pronounced (P < 0.01). Post-operatively no differences in the hormonal profiles could be discerned between the groups with or without acupuncture plus TES (Group 2 vs. Group 3) nor between those with or without moderate-dose fentanyl anaesthesia (Group 1 vs. Group 3). It is concluded that acupuncture and TES have no effect on the cardiovascular response to laryngoscopy and intubation. They can replace moderate-dose fentanyl anaesthesia in major abdominal surgery at the cost of a more enhanced per-operative neuroendocrine stress response, which does not, however, influence the postoperative hormonal profiles nor the rapidity of return to pre-operative values.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Catecholamines)
0 (Pituitary Hormones)
11000-17-2 (Vasopressins)
437-38-7 (Fentanyl)
50-23-7 (Hydrocortisone)
51-41-2 (Norepinephrine)
51-43-4 (Epinephrine)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
9002-60-2 (Corticotropin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19930621 Date Completed: 19930621
Citation ID(s): PMID: 8388332 Medline UI: 93265859
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 10
Title: Met-enkephalin and beta-endorphin are not involved in the analgesic action of transcutaneous vibratory stimulation.
Author(s): Guieu R; Tardy-Gervet MF; Giraud P
Author's Address: Laboratoire de Neurobiologie Humaine, Université de Provence, URA CNRS 372, Marseille, France.
Source: Pain [Pain] 1992 Jan; 48 (1), pp. 83-8.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: NETHERLANDS NLM ID: 7508686 ISSN: 0304-3959
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Analgesia/*methods
Pain/*physiopathology
Vibration/*therapeutic use
beta-Endorphin/*cerebrospinal fluid

Adolescence. Adult. Aged. Aged, 80 and over. Female. Human. Male. Middle Age. Naloxone/pharmacology. Pain Measurement. Radioimmunoassay. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.
Abstract: Although the analgesic effects observed during the application of vibration may be attributable to neuronal inhibition of the pain pathways, this does not account for the fact that pain relief sometimes persists for a long time after the end of vibration treatment. Two experiments were carried out in order to determine whether pain relief might involve the release of endogenous opioids. In the first experiment, we studied the effects of injecting either a morphine antagonist, naloxone (0.4 mg), or a placebo, on the analgesia resulting from vibratory stimulation in 12 patients suffering from acute or chronic pain. In the second experiment, the Met-enkephalin and beta-endorphin levels were determined before and after 30 min vibratory stimulation in the cerebrospinal fluid of 8 patients suffering from chronic pain and 1 control subject, all of whom had been fitted with a ventriculo-peritoneal drain which made it possible to collect samples of cerebrospinal fluid painlessly. The results of these experiments show, on the one hand, that the effects of naloxone on the vibration-induced analgesia did not differ from those of the placebo and, on the other hand, that no increase in the Met-enkephalin or beta-endorphin levels occurred concomitantly with pain relief. It will therefore be necessary to investigate other mechanisms as possible means of explaining the post-vibratory analgesic effects.
CAS Registry No.: 465-65-6 (Naloxone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19920319 Date Completed: 19920319
Citation ID(s): PMID: 1738578 Medline UI: 92150099
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 11
Title: [Effects of transcutaneous nerve stimulation on the plasma and CSF concentrations of beta-endorphin and the plasma concentrations of ACTH, cortisol and prolactin in hysterectomized women with postoperative pain]
Transliterated Title: Efectos de la estimulación nerviosa transcutánea sobre las concentraciones en plasma y en el LCR de betaendorfina y plasmáticas de ACTH, cortisol y prolactina en mujeres histerectomizadas con dolor postoperatorio.
Author(s): Rodríguez E; Meizoso MJ; Garabal M; Fernández MP; Rodríguez-Buján L; Belmonte A
Author's Address: Servicio de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapia del Dolor, Hospital Juan Canalejo, La Coruña.
Source: Revista espanola de anestesiologia y reanimacion [Rev Esp Anestesiol Reanim] 1992 Jan-Feb; 39 (1), pp. 6-9.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Spanish
Journal Info: Country of Publication: SPAIN NLM ID: 0134516 ISSN: 0034-9356
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Corticotropin/*blood
Hydrocortisone/*blood
Hysterectomy/*adverse effects
Pain, Postoperative/*therapy
Prolactin/*blood
beta-Endorphin/*analysis

Adult. Aged. Comparative Study. English Abstract. Female. Human. Middle Age. Pain, Postoperative/blood. Pain, Postoperative/etiology.
Abstract: Plasmatic and cerebrospinal fluid levels of beta-endorphin and plasmatic concentration of ACTH, cortisol, and prolactin were investigated in 10 healthy volunteers free of pain and in a group of 38 patients who presented moderate or intense postoperative pain. The analgesic technique was transcutaneous neural stimulation. In 28 patients the stimulation was delivered at 40-80 Hz (high frequency) whereas in the remaining 10 patients it was administered in a placebo form. Measurements of hormone concentrations were performed using radioimmunoassay techniques. In patients free of pain hormone analysis was done at once, whereas in patients with pain this analysis was performed before and one hour after transcutaneous neural stimulation. We compared data obtained in control subjects with data collected in patients before and one hour after high frequency and placebo transcutaneous neural stimulation. Levels of beta-endorphin were comparable in patients with and without pain. However, ACTH, cortisol, and prolactin were increased in patients with pain. High frequency stimulation induced greater beta-endorphin levels than placebo neural stimulation and slightly lower concentration of prolactin. There were no significant differences in ACTH and cortisol levels.
CAS Registry No.: 50-23-7 (Hydrocortisone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
9002-60-2 (Corticotropin)
9002-62-4 (Prolactin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19920706 Date Completed: 19920706
Citation ID(s): PMID: 1317965 Medline UI: 92285510
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 12
Title: [Beta-endorphins during childbirth under transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation]
Transliterated Title: Verhalten von Beta-Endorphin während der Geburt unter transkutaner elektrischer Nervenstimulation.
Author(s): Lechner W; Jarosch E; Sölder E; Waitz-Penz A; Mitterschiffthaler G
Author's Address: Universitätsklinik für Frauenheilkunde, Innsbruck.
Source: Zentralblatt fur Gynakologie [Zentralbl Gynakol] 1991; 113 (8), pp. 439-42.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: German
Journal Info: Country of Publication: GERMANY NLM ID: 21820100R ISSN: 0044-4197
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Analgesia/*methods
Labor/*blood
beta-Endorphin/*blood

Cross Reactions. English Abstract. Female. Human. Pregnancy. Radioimmunoassay.
Abstract: Beta-endorphins are substances produced by the body to inhibit the perception of pain. Normally they exhibit a steep rise during birth. We have seen an impressive fall which also was statistically highly significant after the application of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation in 20 parturient women.
CAS Registry No.: 60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19910918 Date Completed: 19910918
Citation ID(s): PMID: 1872086 Medline UI: 91335974
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 13
Title: [Changes in the content of beta-endorphin in maternal and fetal blood during transcutaneous electric neurostimulation in premature labor]
Transliterated Title: Izmenenie soderzhaniia beta-éndorfina v krovi materi i ploda v usloviiakh primeneniia chreskozhnoĭ élektroneĭrostimuliatsii pri prezhdevremennykh rodakh.
Author(s): Sokolova NI; Kulakov VI; Malygina SI
Source: Anesteziologiia i reanimatologiia [Anesteziol Reanimatol] 1990 Nov-Dec (6), pp. 17-9.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Russian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: USSR NLM ID: 7705399 ISSN: 0201-7563
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Analgesia, Obstetrical*
Maternal-Fetal Exchange*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Fetal Blood/*chemistry
Labor, Premature/*blood
beta-Endorphin/*blood

English Abstract. Female. Human. Pregnancy.
Abstract: The effect of various parameters of transcutaneous electrical neurostimulation (TENS) on changes in B-endorphin (BE) blood plasma level has been studied in the mother and fetus during premature labour. A dependence of changes in BE plasma level on the frequency regimen of the impulse current has been established. The data, on the one hand, demonstrate the regulating effect of high- and low- frequency TENS on BE blood level and, on the other hand, indicate the involvement of endogenous opioid fetus system, which enables it to endure labour-induced stress.
CAS Registry No.: 60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19910418 Date Completed: 19910418
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2075922 Medline UI: 91166069
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 14
Title: The effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) on catecholamine metabolism during pacing-induced angina pectoris and the influence of naloxone.
Author(s): Mannheimer C; Emanuelsson H; Waagstein F
Author's Address: Department of Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
Source: Pain [Pain] 1990 Apr; 41 (1), pp. 27-34.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: NETHERLANDS NLM ID: 7508686 ISSN: 0304-3959
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Cardiac Pacing, Artificial*
Nervous System Physiology*
Angina Pectoris/*blood
Epinephrine/*blood
Naloxone/*pharmacology
Norepinephrine/*blood

Angina Pectoris/physiopathology. Comparative Study. Electric Stimulation/methods. Female. Heart/physiopathology. Hemodynamics/drug effects. Human. Lactates/metabolism. Lactic Acid. Male. Middle Age. Myocardium/metabolism. Skin.
Abstract: Two invasive studies (invasive study I and invasive study II) showed positive effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in pacing-induced angina pectoris in terms of increased tolerance to pacing, improved lactate metabolism and less anginal pain. Invasive study I demonstrated a decrease in left ventricular afterload by TENS treatment as reflected by a fall in systolic blood pressure, and this fact was thought to be explained by reduced sympathetic activity since arterial levels of epinephrine and norepinephrine dropped during TENS in TENS responders. In invasive study II, the influence of naloxone on the effects of TENS in pacing-induced angina pectoris was studied in 11 patients with severe coronary artery disease. The patients were catheterized and treated with TENS on 2 occasions; one with a single intravenous (i.v.) dose of saline as placebo and one with a single i.v. dose of 50 mg naloxone, double-blind, in random order. Treatment with TENS increased tolerance to pacing (P less than 0.01 with placebo and P less than 0.01 with naloxone, respectively) and improved lactate metabolism (P less than 0.05 with placebo and P less than 0.01 with naloxone, respectively). The positive effects of TENS were thus reproducible and not reversed by single i.v. doses of naloxone. The results of this study indicate that the effects of TENS on the heart are not mediated by beta-endorphin but do not exclude activation of more short-acting opioids like delta or kappa receptor agonists (met-enkephalin and/or dynorphin) since naloxone has a low affinity for these receptors. It is also possible that non-opioid mechanisms are of importance.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Lactates)
465-65-6 (Naloxone)
50-21-5 (Lactic Acid)
51-41-2 (Norepinephrine)
51-43-4 (Epinephrine)
Revision Date: 20011102
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19900713 Date Completed: 19900713
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2352762 Medline UI: 90280069
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 15
Title: Influence of naloxone on the effects of high frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in angina pectoris induced by atrial pacing.
Author(s): Mannheimer C; Emanuelsson H; Waagstein F; Wilhelmsson C
Author's Address: Department of Medicine, Ostra Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
Source: British heart journal [Br Heart J] 1989 Jul; 62 (1), pp. 36-42.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: ENGLAND NLM ID: 0370634 ISSN: 0007-0769
Citation Subsets: AIM; IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Angina Pectoris/*therapy
Naloxone/*pharmacology

Aged. Angina Pectoris/physiopathology. Cardiac Pacing, Artificial. Comparative Study. Double-Blind Method. Female. Heart/drug effects. Hemodynamics/drug effects. Human. Male. Middle Age. Myocardium/metabolism. Random Allocation.
Abstract: The influence of naloxone on the effects of high frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in angina pectoris induced by atrial pacing was studied in 11 patients with severe coronary artery disease. The patients were catheterised and treated with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on two occasions, double blind and in random order, with a single intravenous dose of saline or with a single intravenous dose of 50 mg naloxone. Treatment with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation increased tolerance to pacing and significantly improved lactate metabolism with placebo and with naloxone. The positive effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation were thus reproducible and not reversed by single intravenous doses of naloxone. The results indicate that the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the heart are not mediated by beta endorphin but they do not exclude activation of more short-acting opioids such as delta or kappa receptor agonists (met-enkephalin or dynorphin or both) because naloxone has a low affinity for these receptors. Non-opioid mechanisms may also be important.
CAS Registry No.: 465-65-6 (Naloxone)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19890921 Date Completed: 19890921
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2788001 Medline UI: 89335412
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 16
Title: [Effect of electroanesthesia and neuroleptanalgesia on blood plasma beta-endorphin level during surgical intervention in cancer patients]
Transliterated Title: Vliianie élektroanestezii i neĭroleptanalgezii na kontsentratsiiu beta-éndorfina v plazme krovi pri operativnykh vmeshatel'stvakh v onkologii.
Author(s): Goloskov NP; Saltanov AI; Mistakopulo NF; Kushlinskiĭ NE; Rylov VV
Source: Anesteziologiia i reanimatologiia [Anesteziol Reanimatol] 1989 May-Jun (3), pp. 49-51.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Russian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: USSR NLM ID: 7705399 ISSN: 0201-7563
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Neuroleptanalgesia*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Neoplasms/*surgery
beta-Endorphin/*blood

Adolescence. Adult. Aged. Comparative Study. English Abstract. Human. Middle Age.
Abstract: Beta-endorphin release was studied in 40 patients after surgery for thyroid cancer or after femoral amputation due to malignant malformations in bones and soft tissues of the lower extremities. In thyroid surgery beta-endorphin release was more marked under neuroleptanalgesia than under combined electroanesthesia. A correlation between beta-endorphin and ACTH levels has been established. It indicates a stress nature of neuropeptide release. In patients with femoral amputation an increased beta-endorphin release was not observed. Possible mechanisms of beta-endorphin level elevation are discussed in terms of modern concepts of pain modulation.
CAS Registry No.: 60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19891113 Date Completed: 19891113
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2529796 Medline UI: 90024408
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 17
Title: Effect of physical exercise on pain thresholds and plasma beta-endorphins in patients with silent and symptomatic myocardial ischaemia.
Author(s): Droste C; Meyer-Blankenburg H; Greenlee MW; Roskamm H
Author's Address: Rehabilitationszentrum für Herz- und Kreislaufkranke, Bad Krozingen, F.R.G.
Source: European heart journal [Eur Heart J] 1988 Dec; 9 Suppl N, pp. 25-33.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: ENGLAND NLM ID: 8006263 ISSN: 0195-668X
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Exercise*
Pain*
Coronary Disease/*etiology
Endorphins/*blood

Angina Pectoris/complications. Catecholamines/blood. Comparative Study. Human. Hydrocortisone/blood. Injections, Intravenous. Male. Middle Age. Naloxone/pharmacology. Pain Measurement. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. Time Factors.
Abstract: In a double-blind study, eight patients with symptomatic myocardial ischaemia and nine with asymptomatic myocardial ischaemia were compared during physical exercise under naloxone (6 mg i.v.) or placebo. Plasma beta-endorphin, cortisol and catecholamines were measured before exercise, during maximal exercise, and 10, 20 and 60 min after exercise. A tourniquet pain test (on the forearm, under control of transcutaneous PO2), and an electrical pain test (intracutaneous electrode placed in the finger with the electrical stimulus under computer control and two-interval forced-choice psychophysical technique) were performed before exercise as well as immediately after, and 60 min after exercise. Plasma beta-endorphin levels increased significantly (P less than 0.01) during exercise in symptomatic and asymptomatic patient groups; every patient showed an increase on beta-endorphins during and after exercise. However, the increase found in beta-endorphins during and after exercise was significantly larger (P less than 0.01) in asymptomatic than in symptomatic patients. After naloxone, this difference was no longer evident. Angina pectoris during exercise was reported with less latency in symptomatic patients (P less than 0.05) and occurred in two of nine asymptomatic patients following naloxone. The time course of plasma cortisol levels exhibited the same pattern as beta-endorphins with the same significant differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic groups. Electrical pain thresholds, though on average higher in asymptomatic patients (2.21 mA vs. 0.79 mA), were not affected by exercise or naloxone. Asymptomatic patients required more time to reach pain thresholds in the tourniquet pain test (P less than 0.02). After exercise, tourniquet pain thresholds were significantly lower (P less than 0.01) under naloxone compared with placebo.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Catecholamines)
0 (Endorphins)
465-65-6 (Naloxone)
50-23-7 (Hydrocortisone)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19890614 Date Completed: 19890614
Citation ID(s): PMID: 3246253 Medline UI: 89231809
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 18
Title: [Use of transcranial electrical stimulation for managing the alcohol abstinence syndrome]
Transliterated Title: Ispol'zovanie transkranial'nogo élektricheskogo vozdeĭstviia dlia kupirovaniia alkogol'nogo abstinentnogo sindroma.
Author(s): Grinenko AIa; Krupitskiĭ EM; Lebedev VP; Katsnel'son IaS; Karandashova GF
Source: Fiziologiia cheloveka [Fiziol Cheloveka] 1988 Mar-Apr; 14 (2), pp. 212-8.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Russian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: USSR NLM ID: 7603567 ISSN: 0131-1646
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy/*methods
Ethanol/*adverse effects
Substance Withdrawal Syndrome/*therapy
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation/*methods

Acute Disease. Comparative Study. Dopamine/blood. Electrophysiology. Human. Monoamine Oxidase/blood. Nervous System/physiopathology. Radiculopathy/therapy. Serotonin/blood. Substance Withdrawal Syndrome/blood. Substance Withdrawal Syndrome/physiopathology. beta-Endorphin/blood.
CAS Registry No.: 50-67-9 (Serotonin)
51-61-6 (Dopamine)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
64-17-5 (Ethanol)
EC 1.4.3.4 (Monoamine Oxidase)
Revision Date: 20011119
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19880926 Date Completed: 19880926
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2970412 Medline UI: 88313432
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 19
Title: Effects of dexamethasone on electroacupuncture analgesia and central nervous system metabolism.
Author(s): Liu JZ; Huang YH; Hand PJ
Author's Address: Department of Animal Biology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia 19104.
Source: Acupuncture & electro-therapeutics research [Acupunct Electrother Res] 1988; 13 (1), pp. 9-23.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 7610364 ISSN: 0360-1293
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Acupuncture Therapy*
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Brain/*metabolism
Dexamethasone/*pharmacology

Animal. Autoradiography. Glucose/metabolism. Male. Pain/metabolism. Pain/therapy. Rats. Rats, Inbred Strains. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S..
Abstract: Many reports have indicated that electro-acupuncture analgesia (EAA) was mediated by endorphins. Among them is B-endorphin which can be released from the anterior lobe of the pituitary. To examine the role of B-endorphin in EAA and observe CNS metabolic (functional) and behavioral effects of dexamethasone the present study employed the (14C) 2-deoxyglycose (2DG) method. Seventeen adult male Sprague-Dawley rats in five groups received the following different types of somesthetic stimulation to examine the local cerebral glucose utilization (LCGU) and tail-flick response latency: control group (N = 3), pain group (N = 4), EA group (N = 3), pain + EA group (N = 3; from another ongoing study) and dexamethasone group (N = 4). Dexamethasone reduced tail-flick response latency in response to electroacupuncture, and produced metabolic (functional) changes in a number of CNS structures implicated in electroacupuncture produced analgesia effects (some changes were statistically significant, many others were not). Specific brain structures exhibiting statistically significant changes (p less than 0.05) in LCGU when compared to the pain + EA group are: the parafascicular and habennlar nuclei of the thalamus and the posterior cingulate gyrus. In comparison of dexamethasone group with the other four experimental groups of rats, the following trend in LCGU changes was observed: pain + EA group greater than pain group = EA group = dexamethasone group greater than control group. In addition, dexamethasone had a sedative effect. The results suggest that dexamethasone is reducing EAA and having suppressive effects on CNS metabolism and behavior.
Grant Information: NS-22283-01A2 NS NINDS
CAS Registry No.: 50-02-2 (Dexamethasone)
50-99-7 (Glucose)
Revision Date: 20011102
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19880725 Date Completed: 19880725
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2898201 Medline UI: 88249939
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 20
Title: Electrical stimulation of hypothalamic arcuate nucleus (ARC) can change responses to electroacupuncture of neurons of dorsal raphe nucleus (DR) and locus coeruleus (LC).
Author(s): Mao JR; Yin WP; Yin QZ
Source: Journal of traditional Chinese medicine = Chung i tsa chih ying wen pan [J Tradit Chin Med] 1987 Sep; 7 (3), pp. 215-20.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: CHINA NLM ID: 8211546 ISSN: 0254-6272
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Acupuncture Therapy*
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Arcuate Nucleus/*physiology
Hypothalamus/*physiology
Locus Coeruleus/*physiology
Raphe Nuclei/*physiology

Animal. Electric Stimulation. Electrophysiology. Female. Male. Neurons/physiology. Rats. Rats, Inbred Strains. beta-Endorphin/physiology.
CAS Registry No.: 60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20011102
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19880510 Date Completed: 19880510
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2965284 Medline UI: 88173665
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 21
Title: Activation of periaqueductal grey pools of beta-endorphin by analgetic electrical stimulation in freely moving rats.
Author(s): Millan MJ; Członkowski A; Millan MH; Herz A
Source: Brain research [Brain Res] 1987 Mar 24; 407 (1), pp. 199-203.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: NETHERLANDS NLM ID: 0045503 ISSN: 0006-8993
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Endorphins/*metabolism
Periaqueductal Gray/*metabolism

Animal. Dynorphins/metabolism. Enkephalin, Leucine/metabolism. Enkephalin, Methionine/metabolism. Locomotion. Male. Prolactin/metabolism. Rats. Rats, Inbred Strains. Sensory Thresholds. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: Electrical stimulation of the ventral midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG) elicited an antinociception (analgesia) in freely moving rats. Stimulated animals displayed a pronounced decrease in levels of immunoreactive (ir)-beta-endorphin (beta-EP) in the midbrain PAG. This depletion was selective in that: animals placed in the chamber and not stimulated revealed neither an analgesia nor an alteration in levels of ir-beta-EP. No change in levels of ir-beta-EP was detectable in other brain regions. Both stimulated rats and rats placed in the chamber and not stimulated revealed a rise in circulating ir-beta-EP: the magnitude of this rise did not, however, differ between these groups. Levels of ir-Met-enkephalin, ir-Leu-enkephalin and ir-dynorphin A were modified neither in the PAG nor in other CNS tissues. The data demonstrate that electrical stimulation of the midbrain PAG selectively influences (presumably activates) pools of beta-EP therein. Together with our finding that destruction of PAG-localized beta-EP neurones to block stimulation-analgesia, the data suggest that an activation of intrinsic pools of beta-EP underlies stimulation-produced analgesia elicited from the PAG in the rat.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
58569-55-4 (Enkephalin, Methionine)
58822-25-6 (Enkephalin, Leucine)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
74913-18-1 (Dynorphins)
9002-62-4 (Prolactin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19870714 Date Completed: 19870714
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2884014 Medline UI: 87215102
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 22
Title: Pain and stress: correlation of stress hormone release to pain modulation in man.
Author(s): Pertovaara A; Kemppainen P; Huopaniemi T; Johansson G
Author's Address: Department of Physiology, University of Helsinki, Finland.
Source: Annals of clinical research [Ann Clin Res] 1987; 19 (2), pp. 83-6.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: FINLAND NLM ID: 0220042 ISSN: 0003-4762
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Neurosecretory Systems/*secretion
Pain/*physiopathology
Stress/*physiopathology
Stress, Psychological/*physiopathology

Coronary Disease/physiopathology. Endorphins/physiology. Exertion. Human. Naloxone/diagnostic use. Pain/psychology. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation. beta-Endorphin/blood.
Abstract: The contribution of stress-induced and opioid-dependent mechanisms to the modulation of experimental pain was studied in man under different conditions. The contribution of these mechanisms to the possible attenuation of acute cardiac pain in human patients was also studied. According to the present series of investigations, stress-induced mechanisms might be involved in the modulation of pain caused by physical exercise but not by concurrent subacute pain or transcutaneous nerve stimulation. The lack of any negative correlation between the pain intensity and the release of stress hormones indicates that stress mechanisms do not attenuate acute ischaemic pain of the cardiac origin. The use of an opioid-antagonist, naloxone, and the measurement of plasma levels of beta-endorphin did not reveal any contribution of endogenous opinoids to pain modulation in the current study.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
465-65-6 (Naloxone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19871113 Date Completed: 19871113
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2959193 Medline UI: 88022468
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 23
Title: [Biological and clinical aspects of the participation of neuropeptides in the mechanisms of electroanesthesia]
Transliterated Title: Biologicheskie i klinicheskie aspekty uchastiia neĭropeptidov v mekhanizmakh razvitiia élektroanestezii.
Author(s): Kuzin MI; Shatalov VN; Avrutskiĭ MIa; Shloznikov BM; Machulin AV
Source: Vestnik Akademii meditsinskikh nauk SSSR [Vestn Akad Med Nauk SSSR] 1987 (2), pp. 10-7.
Pub. Type: Journal Article; Review
Language: Russian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: USSR NLM ID: 7506153 ISSN: 0002-3027
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electronarcosis*
Neuropeptides/*physiology

Adult. Animal. Comparative Study. Diazepam/pharmacology. Electroencephalography. Endorphins/physiology. English Abstract. Evoked Potentials, Auditory/drug effects. Gastrointestinal Diseases/physiopathology. Human. Male. Naloxone/pharmacology. Rabbits. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation. beta-Endorphin.
No. of References: 52
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
0 (Neuropeptides)
439-14-5 (Diazepam)
465-65-6 (Naloxone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20011119
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19870526 Date Completed: 19870526
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2953138 Medline UI: 87208305
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 24
Title: [Effects of neonatal administration of monosodium glutamate on acupuncture analgesia and beta-endorphin-immunoreactive neurons in the rat hypothalamic arcuate nucleus]
Author(s): Chen QL; Liu HC; Gu F; Yin QZ
Source: Zhen ci yan jiu = Acupuncture research [Zhen Ci Yan Jiu] 1987; 12 (3), pp. 235-8.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Chinese
Journal Info: Country of Publication: CHINA NLM ID: 8507710 ISSN: 1000-0607
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Acupuncture Therapy*
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Arcuate Nucleus/*metabolism
Glutamates/*pharmacology
Sodium Glutamate/*pharmacology
beta-Endorphin/*metabolism

Animal. English Abstract. Hypothalamus/metabolism. Immunohistochemistry. Injections, Intraperitoneal. Male. Rats.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Glutamates)
142-47-2 (Sodium Glutamate)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20011102
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19880411 Date Completed: 19880411
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2964315 Medline UI: 88151222
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 25
Title: [Plasma beta-endorphin and electric analgesia during labor]
Transliterated Title: Bêta-endorphines plasmatiques et analgésie électrique durant l'accouchement.
Author(s): Stimmesse B; Belon JP; Hatt-Magno E; Arbez C; Chaillet R; Adloff M; Clément C; Magnin P; Colette C; Barale F
Source: Cahiers d'anesthesiologie [Cah Anesthesiol] 1986 Dec; 34 (8), pp. 641-2.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: French
Journal Info: Country of Publication: FRANCE NLM ID: 0370650 ISSN: 0007-7625
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Anesthesia, Obstetrical*
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Labor*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Endorphins/*blood

Female. Human. Pregnancy. beta-Endorphin.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19870506 Date Completed: 19870506
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2950985 Medline UI: 87158946
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 26
Title: Gastric and autonomic responses to stress in functional dyspepsia.
Author(s): Camilleri M; Malagelada JR; Kao PC; Zinsmeister AR
Source: Digestive diseases and sciences [Dig Dis Sci] 1986 Nov; 31 (11), pp. 1169-77.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 7902782 ISSN: 0163-2116
Citation Subsets: AIM; IM
MeSH Heading: Gastrointestinal Motility*
Autonomic Nervous System/*physiopathology
Dyspepsia/*physiopathology
Stress/*physiopathology

Adult. Dyspepsia/etiology. Endorphins/blood. Female. Human. Male. Manometry. Middle Age. Stress/complications. Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.. Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: It has been suggested that functional dyspepsia might arise from the effect of stress on upper gut motility in susceptible individuals. The aim of this study was to evaluate posticibal antral motility in the presence and absence of sustained experimental stress by means of a transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulator. Two groups of patients could be recognized from these studies: first, those with postcibal antral hypomotility that was not changed during stress; and second, patients with normal postcibal motility which was normally suppressed by stress. Experimental stress significantly increased skin conductance and plasma beta-endorphin levels. However, in these two groups, there were no differences in clinical presentation and personality traits or in autonomic and humoral variables either before or during stress. Stepwise discriminant analysis of the autonomic or humoral responses to stress was unable to predict the different postcibal antral motor responses among the subsets of patients with functional dyspepsia. These data suggest that there are two subtypes of antral motility in functional dyspepsia: disordered gastric function under basal conditions resulting in antral hypomotility, and normal basal antral motility and autonomic and gastric motor responses to stress. In the latter subgroup, the cause of symptoms is unclear, but it appears not to be a motility disorder.
Grant Information: AM 26428 AM NIADDK
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19861208 Date Completed: 19861208
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2945708 Medline UI: 87029755
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 27
Title: [Frequency as the cardinal determinant for electroacupuncture analgesia to be reversed by opioid antagonists]
Author(s): Han JS; Ding XZ; Fan SG
Source: Sheng li xue bao [Acta physiologica Sinica] [Sheng Li Xue Bao] 1986 Oct; 38 (5), pp. 475-82.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Chinese
Journal Info: Country of Publication: CHINA NLM ID: 20730130R ISSN: 0371-0874
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Acupuncture Therapy*
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Enkephalins/*antagonists & inhibitors
Naloxone/*pharmacology

Animal. Dynorphins/antagonists & inhibitors. Endorphins/antagonists & inhibitors. English Abstract. Naltrexone/pharmacology. Pain/physiopathology. Rats. Sensory Thresholds. beta-Endorphin.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
0 (Enkephalins)
16590-41-3 (Naltrexone)
465-65-6 (Naloxone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
74913-18-1 (Dynorphins)
Revision Date: 20011102
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19870330 Date Completed: 19870330
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2881357 Medline UI: 87149159
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 28
Title: Dose-related effects of synthetic human beta-endorphin and naloxone on fed gastrointestinal motility.
Author(s): Camilleri M; Malagelada JR; Stanghellini V; Zinsmeister AR; Kao PC; Li CH
Source: American journal of physiology [Am J Physiol] 1986 Jul; 251 (1 Pt 1), pp. G147-54.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 0370511 ISSN: 0002-9513
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Endorphins/*pharmacology
Gastrointestinal Motility/*drug effects
Naloxone/*pharmacology

Adolescence. Adult. Dose-Response Relationship, Drug. Drug Interactions. Endorphins/blood. Female. Food. Human. Male. Manometry. Middle Age. Pressure. Pyloric Antrum/physiology. Pylorus/physiology. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: In humans, plasma beta-endorphin levels rise during application of acute stressful stimuli (vertigo, cold pain, and transcutaneous electrical stimulation) that induce gut motor disturbances. Whereas it is possible that circulating beta-endorphin participates in the mediation of these central effects on gut motility, its role cannot be established solely on the basis of changes in plasma levels. Therefore, we designed the present study to investigate 1) the dose-related effects of intravenous synthetic human beta-endorphin and naloxone on gastrointestinal pressure activity in fed healthy individuals; and 2) the interactions of the opiate agonist and antagonist. Infusion of beta-endorphin increased pyloric phasic pressure activity (P less than 0.001) and induced intestinal bursts of rhythmic activity (P less than 0.05) which interrupted normal fed motility. These effects were dose related, with the pyloric dose-response profile being essentially linear. The effects in the proximal intestine were obtained with doses of beta-endorphin at 250 ng X kg-1 X min-1 or greater. In the antrum, there was an overall reduction in phasic pressure activity (P less than 0.02), which was predominantly an effect of the highest dose of beta-endorphin infused (2,500 ng X kg-1 X min-1). Naloxone by itself had no significant effect on fed upper gut motility. However, naloxone significantly inhibited the effect of the lower doses of beta-endorphin on the pylorus. In addition, naloxone significantly reduced the probability of beta-endorphin, triggering intestinal bursts of rhythmic activity. These data suggest that beta-endorphin may play a humoral role in the stimulation of fed pyloric contraction at physiological levels.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)
Grant Information: AM-26428 AM NIADDK; AM-34988 AM NIADDK
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
465-65-6 (Naloxone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19860808 Date Completed: 19860808
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2942039 Medline UI: 86265995
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 29
Title: Effects of naloxone on dental pain threshold following muscle exercise and low frequency transcutaneous nerve stimulation: a comparative study in man.
Author(s): Olausson B; Eriksson E; Ellmarker L; Rydenhag B; Shyu BC; Andersson SA
Source: Acta physiologica Scandinavica [Acta Physiol Scand] 1986 Feb; 126 (2), pp. 299-305.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: SWEDEN NLM ID: 0370362 ISSN: 0001-6772
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Anesthesia, Dental*
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Exertion*
Muscle Contraction*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Naloxone/*pharmacology
Nociceptors/*physiology
Pain/*physiopathology
Tooth/*innervation

Adult. Comparative Study. Double-Blind Method. Human. Sensory Thresholds. Sodium Chloride/pharmacology. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't.
Abstract: Previous studies have shown that muscle exercise and low frequency transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TNS) give rise to an analgesic effect in humans and animals. Endorphin has been proposed to mediate this analgesia. In this investigation, the effect of muscle exercise and low frequency TNS, on dental pain thresholds was studied and the possible involvement of endorphinergic mechanisms was investigated using naloxone as an antagonist. Dental pain thresholds were measured in 11 volunteers following leg or arm exercise and after low frequency TNS of the hands or face. After exercise (20 min) or stimulation (30 min) either 0.8 mg naloxone (2 ml) or saline (2 ml) was injected i.v. in a double-blind fashion. Pain thresholds were measured repetitively before and after exercise or stimulation. Both leg and arm exercise increased pain threshold. Stimulation of the hands also increased pain threshold, but less than arm exercise. A marked increase in pain threshold was seen after face stimulation. These changes in pain threshold were unaffected following injections of either naloxone or saline, except for an early and short-lasting reduction when naloxone was injected following arm exercise. The increases in pain threshold following muscle exercise and after low frequency TNS, showed similarities suggesting that a common mechanism might be involved. The pain threshold increase after arm exercise could only be partially mediated by endorphinergic mechanisms.
CAS Registry No.: 465-65-6 (Naloxone)
7647-14-5 (Sodium Chloride)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19860527 Date Completed: 19860527
Citation ID(s): PMID: 3486546 Medline UI: 86211291
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 30
Title: Effect of naltrexone on apnea of prematurity and on plasma beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity.
Author(s): MacDonald MG; Moss IR; Kefale GG; Ginzburg HM; Fink RJ; Chin L
Source: Developmental pharmacology and therapeutics [Dev Pharmacol Ther] 1986; 9 (5), pp. 301-9.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: SWITZERLAND NLM ID: 8003947 ISSN: 0379-8305
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Infant, Premature*
Apnea/*immunology
Endorphins/*immunology
Naltrexone/*pharmacology

Apnea/blood. Apnea/drug therapy. Endorphins/blood. Human. Infant. Infant, Newborn. Injections, Intravenous. Naltrexone/administration & dosage. Naltrexone/therapeutic use. Respiration/drug effects. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.. Xanthines/therapeutic use. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: Plasma levels of beta-endorphin-like immunoreactivity (beta-ELI) were measured in premature infants with apnea (n = 11) and compared to those in nonapneic controls (n = 9). Naltrexone (1-3 mg/kg) was given to the infants with apnea, 6 of whom were also receiving methylxanthines. Chest wall movements, nasal airflow, transcutaneous PO2 and electrocardiogram were recorded for 4-6 h prior to and for 4-6 h after administration of naltrexone. Samples for beta-ELI were taken prior to and 1 h post naltrexone. beta-ELI levels were significantly higher (p less than 0.007) in infants with apnea of prematurity than in control infants. No significant difference was found in beta-ELI levels before and after naltrexone. Naltrexone did not decrease the incidence of apnea.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
0 (Xanthines)
16590-41-3 (Naltrexone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19870112 Date Completed: 19870112
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2946562 Medline UI: 87053134
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 31
Title: Central and peripheral beta-endorphin response to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation.
Author(s): Facchinetti F; Sforza G; Amidei M; Cozza C; Petraglia F; Montanari C; Genazzani AR
Author's Address: Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Modena, Italy.
Source: NIDA research monograph [NIDA Res Monogr] 1986; 75, pp. 555-8.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 8811762 ISSN: 1046-9516
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Skin/*innervation
beta-Endorphin/*blood

Aged. Electric Stimulation. Human. Middle Age. beta-Endorphin/cerebrospinal fluid. beta-Endorphin/secretion.
Abstract: The effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels of beta-Endorphin (beta-EP) were studied in 6 groups of pain-free patients. Different modes of TENS were applied for 20 minutes. Regardless of mode and/or frequency of the stimulation plasma and/or CSF beta-EP levels were significantly increased. Plasma and CSF responses were not correlated suggesting that TENS activates different opiatergic pathways at central and peripheral level.
CAS Registry No.: 60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19880318 Date Completed: 19880318
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2963222 Medline UI: 88122485
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 32
Title: [The endorphin system and transcutaneous neurostimulation]
Transliterated Title: Système endorphinique et neuro-stimulation transcutanée.
Author(s): Crielaard JM; Bastin R; Reuter AM; Vrindts N; Franchimont P
Source: Revue medicale de Liege [Rev Med Liege] 1985 Sep 15; 40 (18), pp. 619-24.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: French
Journal Info: Country of Publication: BELGIUM NLM ID: 0404317 ISSN: 0370-629X
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy/*methods
Endorphins/*blood
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation/*methods

Adolescence. Adult. Human. Male. beta-Endorphin.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19860214 Date Completed: 19860214
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2934782 Medline UI: 86095985
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 33
Title: Pharmacology of enkephalinase inhibitors: animal and human studies.
Author(s): Ehrenpreis S
Source: Acupuncture & electro-therapeutics research [Acupunct Electrother Res] 1985; 10 (3), pp. 203-8.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 7610364 ISSN: 0360-1293
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Protease Inhibitors*
Nociceptors/*drug effects

Acupuncture Therapy. Animal. Bacitracin/pharmacology. Brain/drug effects. Captopril/pharmacology. Endorphins/metabolism. Enkephalin, Methionine/metabolism. Guinea Pigs. Leucine/analogs & derivatives. Leucine/pharmacology. Mice. Neprilysin. Phenylalanine/pharmacology. Puromycin/pharmacology. Spinal Cord/drug effects. Structure-Activity Relationship. Synaptic Transmission/drug effects. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: We have shown that a number of compounds which inhibit the degradation of met-enkephalin can produce naloxone-reversible analgesia in mice. These compounds also potentiate the analgesia produced by acupuncture, foot shock, and transcutaneous nerve stimulation in animals and humans. The potency of their effectiveness as analgesics or potentiators parallels their potency as inhibitors of mouse brain enkephalinase. D-Phenylalanine (DPA), one of these enkephalinase inhibitors, has been used successfully for the management of chronic intractable pain in humans and to potentiate the treatment of many painful conditions by acupuncture. Other aspects of pharmacology of DPA will be discussed, including its effects on the cardio-vascular system, behavior, and lack of development of tolerance and dependence when used chronically in animals and humans.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
0 (Protease Inhibitors)
1405-87-4 (Bacitracin)
53-79-2 (Puromycin)
58569-55-4 (Enkephalin, Methionine)
58970-76-6 (bestatin)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
61-90-5 (Leucine)
62571-86-2 (Captopril)
63-91-2 (Phenylalanine)
EC 3.4.24.11 (Neprilysin)
Revision Date: 20011102
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19860114 Date Completed: 19860114
Citation ID(s): PMID: 2866674 Medline UI: 86073623
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 34
Title: [Changes in the beta-endorphin levels in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid during transcranial electroanalgesia]
Transliterated Title: Ob izmenenii urovnia beta-éndorfina v mozge i spinnomozgovoĭ zhidkosti pri transkranial'noĭ élektroanalgezii.
Author(s): Aĭrapetov LN; Zaĭchik AM; Trukhmanov MS; Lebedev VP; Sorokoumov VA
Source: Fiziologicheskii zhurnal SSSR imeni I. M. Sechenova [Fiziol Zh SSSR Im I M Sechenova] 1985 Jan; 71 (1), pp. 56-64.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Russian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: USSR NLM ID: 0427673 ISSN: 0015-329X
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Brain/*metabolism
Cerebrospinal Fluid/*metabolism
Endorphins/*metabolism

Adult. Animal. Brain Chemistry. Chronic Disease. Comparative Study. Endorphins/analysis. Human. Middle Age. Pain/metabolism. Pituitary Gland/metabolism. Rabbits. Spinal Diseases/metabolism. Time Factors. beta-Endorphin.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19850411 Date Completed: 19850411
Citation ID(s): PMID: 3156056 Medline UI: 85127630
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 35
Title: Effect of somatovisceral reflexes and selective dermatomal stimulation on postcibal antral pressure activity.
Author(s): Camilleri M; Malagelada JR; Kao PC; Zinsmeister AR
Source: American journal of physiology [Am J Physiol] 1984 Dec; 247 (6 Pt 1), pp. G703-8.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 0370511 ISSN: 0002-9513
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Eating*
Pyloric Antrum/*physiology
Skin/*innervation

Abdomen. Adult. Blood Pressure. Catecholamines/blood. Comparative Study. Electric Stimulation. Endorphins/blood. Female. Hand. Human. Male. Middle Age. Pressure. Pulse. Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: Our objective was to elicit and characterize somatogastric reflexes in healthy humans. Sustained somatic stimulation by transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) was applied to the skin of human volunteers while simultaneously monitoring their upper gastrointestinal phasic pressure activity, extraintestinal vasomotor indices, and plasma levels of putative humoral mediators of autonomic reflexes. Stimuli were applied either to the hand (C8-T1) or to the upper abdomen (T5-T10) to determine whether impulses at these two dermatomes produce different effects on fed antral phasic pressure activity. TENS resulted in significant reduction (P = 0.007) in antral motility index when applied to the hand and abdomen as compared with sham stimulation. This was associated with an increase in skin conductance and plasma beta-endorphin levels but no change in pulse, blood pressure, or circulating catecholamine levels. No qualitative changes in proximal intestinal pressure activity were detected. Sustained somatic stimuli resulted in reduced postprandial antral phasic pressure activity. The similarity of the responses to TENS applied to the hand and abdominal dermatomes suggests that the induced somatovisceral responses relay predominantly at the cerebral level.
Grant Information: AM-26428 AM NIADDK
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Catecholamines)
0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19850124 Date Completed: 19850124
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6095677 Medline UI: 85069812
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 36
Title: Pilot study on the effects of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on the level of plasma beta-endorphin.
Author(s): Elkiss M; Ingall JR; Dooley J
Source: Journal of the American Osteopathic Association [J Am Osteopath Assoc] 1984 Sep; 84 (1 Suppl), pp. 144-7.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 7503065 ISSN: 0098-6151
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Back Pain/*therapy
Endorphins/*blood

Adult. Back Pain/blood. Female. Human. Male. Middle Age. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. beta-Endorphin.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19841128 Date Completed: 19841128
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6092303 Medline UI: 85029933
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 37
Title: Effect of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation on human blood beta-endorphin levels.
Author(s): O'Brien WJ; Rutan FM; Sanborn C; Omer GE
Source: Physical therapy [Phys Ther] 1984 Sep; 64 (9), pp. 1367-74.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 0022623 ISSN: 0031-9023
Citation Subsets: AIM; IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy*/methods
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*/methods
Endorphins/*blood

Analysis of Variance. Comparative Study. Electric Stimulation. Female. Human. Male. Naloxone/diagnostic use. Pain/blood. Pain/etiology. Pain/therapy. Radioimmunoassay. Random Allocation. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. Time Factors. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: We randomly assigned 42 subjects for treatment with transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) to one of three groups: conventional TENS--80 Hz; low frequency TENS--2 Hz; and a control group--TENS without batteries. Pain threshold measurements and blood beta-endorphin levels were obtained at regular intervals before, during, and for 17 hours after TENS application. We found no significant difference in blood beta-endorphin levels between the groups before, during, or immediately after TENS application. The differences in pain threshold and beta-endorphin levels appeared to be a function of the patient-selection process and not the application of TENS. The results indicated that TENS, with the stimulation characteristics used in this study, did not significantly change the measured plasma levels of beta-endorphin. The blind administration of naloxone hydrochloride, an opiate antagonist, did not significantly alter the perceived experimental pain of these subjects. We could find no evidence that TENS altered experimental pain threshold or plasma beta-endorphin levels.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
465-65-6 (Naloxone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19841018 Date Completed: 19841018
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6089237 Medline UI: 84298574
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 38
Title: Concomitant increase in nociceptive flexion reflex threshold and plasma opioids following transcutaneous nerve stimulation.
Author(s): Facchinetti F; Sandrini G; Petraglia F; Alfonsi E; Nappi G; Genazzani AR
Source: Pain [Pain] 1984 Jul; 19 (3), pp. 295-303.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Controlled Clinical Trial; Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: NETHERLANDS NLM ID: 7508686 ISSN: 0304-3959
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Muscle Contraction*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Corticotropin/*blood
Endorphins/*blood
Lipotropin/*blood
Nociceptors/*physiology
Reflex/*physiology

Adult. Human. Hydrocortisone/blood. Male. Sciatic Nerve/physiology. Sensory Thresholds. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: In order to evaluate the role of endogenous opioids in sustaining analgesia induced by transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TNS), we measured plasma beta-lipotropin (BLPH), beta-endorphin (BEP), ACTH and cortisol changes concomitantly with nociceptive flexion reflex (RIII) threshold after TNS (80 microseconds rectangular waves at 85 Hz) in a group of healthy volunteers (A). The same protocol was carried out in another group of volunteers using placebo stimulation (0.5 Hz) (B). RIII threshold significantly increased 0.5 h after TNS in group A and no changes were recorded in group B. Similarly, both BLPH and BEP plasma levels increased at the end of TNS only in group A. ACTH and cortisol concentrations show only random variations after both high and low frequency TNS. A positive linear correlation was found between the maximum percentage increase of RIII threshold after high frequency TNS and the maximum percentage increase of BLPH plasma levels occurring 20 min beforehand (r = 0.856, P less than 0.001). A less positive correlation was found between RIII and BEP levels (r = 0.574, P less than 0.05). These data indicate that the so-called post-stimulation analgesia could be supported by the enhancement of the endogenous opioid system.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
50-23-7 (Hydrocortisone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
9002-60-2 (Corticotropin)
9035-55-6 (Lipotropin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19841011 Date Completed: 19841011
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6089074 Medline UI: 84296780
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 39
Title: Response of plasma beta-endorphins to transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in healthy subjects.
Author(s): Hughes GS Jr; Lichstein PR; Whitlock D; Harker C
Source: Physical therapy [Phys Ther] 1984 Jul; 64 (7), pp. 1062-6.
Pub. Type: Clinical Trial; Journal Article; Randomized Controlled Trial
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 0022623 ISSN: 0031-9023
Citation Subsets: AIM; IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy*/methods
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*/methods
Endorphins/*blood

Adult. Evoked Potentials. Female. Human. Male. Pulse. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: A study of 31 healthy volunteers was done to test the hypothesis that analgesia produced by low frequency/high intensity (LoF/Hil) transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is mediated by release of beta-endorphin (beta-E). After randomization, Group 1 (n = 10) received no stimulation (placebo); Group 2 (n = 9) received 30 minutes of high frequency/low intensity (HiF/Lol) TENS; and Group 3 (n = 12) received 30 minutes of low frequency/high density (LoF/Hil) TENS. Blood pressure, pulse, plasma beta-E levels, and evoked potential response were measured before and after treatment. Mean plasma beta-E increased with treatment in Groups 2 and 3 and fell in Group 1, but the difference between the groups was not statistically significant. Sixty-seven percent of Groups 2 and 3 showed an increase in plasma beta-E levels compared with 30 percent in Group 1 (two-sample test of proportions, p less than .05). Evoked potential response, a measure of pain threshold, varied directly with plasma beta-E level independent of the type of treatment applied. This study did not demonstrate a difference between the effects of HiF/Lol versus Lof/Hil TENS on plasma beta-E in healthy subjects.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20010323
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19840731 Date Completed: 19840731
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6330773 Medline UI: 84248273
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 40
Title: [Effect of transcutaneous transcerebral electrostimulation as electroanesthesia on the beta-endorphin content of the cerebrospinal fluid and blood plasma]
Transliterated Title: Vliianie chreskozhnoĭ transtserebral'noĭ élektrostimuliatsii v rezhime élektroanestezii na soderzhanie beta-éndorfina v spinnomozgovoĭ zhidkosti i plazme krovi.
Author(s): Kuzin MI; Avrutskiĭ MIa; Shliuznikov BM; Lakhter MA; Panchenko LF
Source: Biulleten' eksperimental'noi biologii i meditsiny [Biull Eksp Biol Med] 1984 May; 97 (5), pp. 515-6.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Russian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: USSR NLM ID: 0370627 ISSN: 0365-9615
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Electronarcosis*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Endorphins/*analysis

Adult. Cardiac Surgical Procedures. Comparative Study. English Abstract. Female. Human. Male. Preoperative Care. Time Factors. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: The beta-endorphin content was measured in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and blood plasma of patients before and after 30 minutes of transcutaneous transcerebral electric stimulation in the electric anesthesia mode. The output current was biphasic and rectangular. It was composed of high-frequency pulse trains (peak-to-peak intensity 250-300 mA, frequency 167 kHz) modulated by low frequency (77 Hz). Electrical stimulation resulted in an appreciable increase in the beta-endorphin content in the CSF and blood plasma of patients. The data obtained attest to the intensification of the neuromodulator release to the CSF and blood plasma and to the involvement of the endorphinergic brain systems in the realization of the analgetic effect of transcutaneous transcerebral electric stimulation.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20011119
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19840726 Date Completed: 19840726
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6326889 Medline UI: 84203996
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 41
Title: Effect of electroacupuncture on synaptosomal (Na+ + K+)-ATPase.
Author(s): Lee DZ; Sun AY
Source: Neurochemical research [Neurochem Res] 1984 May; 9 (5), pp. 669-78.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: UNITED STATES NLM ID: 7613461 ISSN: 0364-3190
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Acupuncture Therapy*
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase/*metabolism
Synaptosomes/*enzymology

Acetylcholinesterase/metabolism. Animal. Cerebral Cortex/enzymology. Endorphins/pharmacology. Enkephalin, Methionine/pharmacology. Male. Naloxone/pharmacology. Rats. Rats, Inbred F344. alpha-Endorphin.
Abstract: The action of electroacupuncture (EA) may be similar to analgesia by electrode stimulation or transcutaneous nerve stimulation. Since EA may directly stimulate nerve activity or indirectly enhance the release of opiate peptides and other neurotransmitter substances, we have used (Na+ + K+)-ATPase as a model to study the mechanism of action of EA. The membrane-bound (Na + K)-ATPase from purified synaptic plasma membranes inhibited slightly by high concentration of endorphin (30 microM), but not by met-enkephalin up to 6 X 10(-4) M. A single EA treatment for 30 min did not alter the (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity in the cerebral cortex. However, when rats were treated with low (4 Hz) or high (200 Hz) frequency EA 30 min daily for 3 weeks, both (Na+ + K+)-ATPase and acetylcholinesterase were significantly elevated. The enhanced (Na+ + K+)-ATPase activity after high frequency EA was only partially blocked by i.p. injection of naloxone prior to EA during the last week of the EA treatment program. The results indicated that EA treatment may involve some other neurotransmitter pathways besides opiate peptides.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
465-65-6 (Naloxone)
58569-55-4 (Enkephalin, Methionine)
61512-76-3 (alpha-Endorphin)
EC 3.1.1.7 (Acetylcholinesterase)
EC 3.6.1.37 (Na(+)-K(+)-Exchanging ATPase)
Revision Date: 20011102
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19840925 Date Completed: 19840925
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6147770 Medline UI: 84295855
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 42
Title: Hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and plasma beta-endorphin.
Author(s): Sankaran K; Hindmarsh KW; Watson VG
Source: Developmental pharmacology and therapeutics [Dev Pharmacol Ther] 1984; 7 (6), pp. 377-83.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: SWITZERLAND NLM ID: 8003947 ISSN: 0379-8305
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Asphyxia Neonatorum/*blood
Brain Diseases/*blood
Endorphins/*blood
Fetal Anoxia/*blood

Asphyxia Neonatorum/etiology. Birth Weight. Brain Diseases/etiology. Female. Fetal Anoxia/etiology. Gestational Age. Human. Infant, Newborn. Pregnancy. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: In an attempt to determine whether hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy in and of itself or its associated pathologic conditions lead to increased concentrations of plasma beta-endorphin (beta-ED), measurements were made in three groups of term infants. Group 1 (control) consisted of 8 infants with a mean gestation of 38.6 +/- (SE) 0.4 weeks, a mean birth weight of 3,420 +/- 150 g, and a mean postnatal age of 1.4 +/- 0.7 days. Group 2 consisted of 10 infants with a mean gestational age, birth weight and postnatal age of 40.1 +/- 0.5 weeks, 3,310 +/- 80 g and 3,9 +/- 1.1 days, and group 3 included 6 infants with a mean gestational age, birth weight and postnatal age of 40.4 +/- 1 weeks, 3,650 +/- 310 g, and 2.8 +/- 1 days, respectively. The group 2 and 3 infants suffered clinical and neurological evidence of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury from perinatal asphyxia; however, the infants in group 2 suffered additional problems such as meconium aspiration, persistent fetal circulation with ongoing hypoxemia as measured by transcutaneous or umbilical arterial oxygen monitoring. The group 3 infants were normoxemic after resuscitation. The mean plasma beta-ED concentrations were 19 +/- (SE) 2.7, 103 +/- 35.7 and 25 +/- 4.5 pg/ml in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively. A significant elevation of plasma beta-ED concentration was observed in group 2 when compared to groups 1 and 3. The association of increased plasma beta-ED concentration in infants with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy associated with ongoing hypoxemia suggests that hypoxemia may act as a strong stimulus for plasma beta-ED release in term infants.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19850314 Date Completed: 19850314
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6097423 Medline UI: 85100809
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 43
Title: [Changes in the activity of plasma beta-endorphin-like-immunoreactivity induced by transcutaneous stimulation of the brain]
Transliterated Title: Modificazioni dell'attivita' beta-ELI plasmatica indotte dalla stimolazione cerebrale transcutanea.
Author(s): Lazzari C; Anzola GP; Di Monda V; Poloni A
Source: Bollettino della Societa italiana di biologia sperimentale [Boll Soc Ital Biol Sper] 1983 Nov 30; 59 (11), pp. 1704-10.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: Italian
Journal Info: Country of Publication: ITALY NLM ID: 7506962 ISSN: 0037-8771
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Transcutaneous Electric Nerve Stimulation*
Endorphins/*blood

Adolescence. Adult. Brain/physiology. English Abstract. Female. Headache/therapy. Human. Male. Middle Age. Radioimmunoassay. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: A newly devised technique of electrical transcutaneous brain stimulation has been applied to a population of cephalalgic patients in order to assess its proficiency in pain relieving and in increasing the concentration of serum endorphins. A significant pain relief associated with an increase in serum endorphins has been obtained only in those patients in which clinical and instrumental evaluations had identified the headache as one of "organic" origin. By contrast both in "non organic" and in control subjects the technique has proved to be effectiveless. Our results suggest that transcutaneous electrical brain stimulation can affect the release of endogenous opioids relieving pain at least in selected patients.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19840406 Date Completed: 19840406
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6320848 Medline UI: 84128266
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 44
Title: In search of mediators of skin vasodilation induced by transcutaneous nerve stimulation: II. Serotonin implicated.
Author(s): Kaada B; Eielsen O
Source: General pharmacology [Gen Pharmacol] 1983; 14 (6), pp. 635-41.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: ENGLAND NLM ID: 7602417 ISSN: 0306-3623
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Serotonin/*physiology
Serotonin Antagonists/*pharmacology
Skin/*blood supply
Vasodilation/*drug effects

Adult. Aged. Brain Chemistry/drug effects. Cyproheptadine/pharmacology. Diabetic Neuropathies/physiopathology. Electric Stimulation. Female. Human. Male. Raynaud's Disease/physiopathology. Support, Non-U.S. Gov't. Vascular Diseases/physiopathology.
Abstract: Previous studies have shown that brain serotonin is increased and noradrenaline decreased in acupuncture and transcutaneous nerve stimulation (TNS). Increases in available brain serotonin and decreases in noradrenaline enhance pain suppression. The present study tests the possibility that the widespread and prolonged cutaneous vasodilation which can be produced by low-frequency TNS in patients with peripheral circulatory insufficiency is similarly dependent on a central serotonergic pathway leading to sympatho-inhibition. The serotonin receptor antagonist cyproheptadine was given to 4 patients with either Raynaud's phenomenon or diabetic polyneuropathy, who all prior to drug administration responded to TNS with marked and prolonged cutaneous vasodilation in the ischaemic limbs. Cyproheptadine almost completely blocked the vascular response. Contrary to endorphin-serotonin mediated pain inhibition, vasoconstrictor inhibition is not antagonized by conventional, low doses of naloxone (Kaada, 1982a). However, the involvement of more naloxone-resistant opioid receptors in the vascular response cannot be excluded.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Serotonin Antagonists)
129-03-3 (Cyproheptadine)
50-67-9 (Serotonin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19840321 Date Completed: 19840321
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6662343 Medline UI: 84109474
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 45
Title: Dental analgesia produced by non-painful low-frequency stimulation is not influenced by stress or reversed by naloxone.
Author(s): Pertovaara A; Kemppainen P; Johansson G; Karonen SL
Source: Pain [Pain] 1982 Aug; 13 (4), pp. 379-84.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: NETHERLANDS NLM ID: 7508686 ISSN: 0304-3959
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Dental Pulp/*innervation
Electric Stimulation Therapy/*methods
Naloxone/*pharmacology
Nociceptors/*physiology
Stress/*blood

Adult. Corticotropin/blood. Endorphins/physiology. Female. Human. Male. Prolactin/blood. Sensory Thresholds. Somatotropin/blood. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: The dental pain threshold elevation produced by non-painful, low-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in healthy humans was not reduced by the administration of 0.8 mg of naloxone i.v. Neither ACTH, prolactin nor growth hormone (GH) release were related to the pain threshold elevations. The present study indicates that the dental pain threshold elevation during non-painful, low-frequency TENS is not based on the same opioid-dependent mechanisms as the dental pain threshold elevation during acupuncture or the clinical analgesia during low-frequency TENS. Stress or other adenohypophyseal mechanisms involving ACTH, prolactin or GH do not explain the analgesia induced by non-painful, low-frequency TENS.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
465-65-6 (Naloxone)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
9002-60-2 (Corticotropin)
9002-62-4 (Prolactin)
9002-72-6 (Somatotropin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19821218 Date Completed: 19821218
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6290963 Medline UI: 83038187
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 46
Title: Effect of transcutaneous electrotherapy on CSF beta-endorphin content in patients without pain problems.
Author(s): Salar G; Job I; Mingrino S; Bosio A; Trabucchi M
Source: Pain [Pain] 1981 Apr; 10 (2), pp. 169-72.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: NETHERLANDS NLM ID: 7508686 ISSN: 0304-3959
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Analgesia*
Electric Stimulation Therapy*
Endorphins/*cerebrospinal fluid

Adult. Aged. Female. Human. Male. Middle Age. beta-Endorphin.
Abstract: To test the hypothesis of opiate-like peptide release after transcutaneous electrotherapy we measured beta-endorphin cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) content in 13 patients without pain problems. The results indicate a time dependent increase of CSF beta-endorphin in the group of patients studied. This fact suggests that the analgesic properties of the treatment may be ascribed to an involvement of the endogenous opiates system, independently from the basal clinical conditions of the patients.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
60617-12-1 (beta-Endorphin)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19811014 Date Completed: 19811014
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6267542 Medline UI: 81271901
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 47
Title: Predictors for the outcome of treatment with high frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in patients with chronic pain.
Author(s): Johansson F; Almay BG; Von Knorring L; Terenius L
Source: Pain [Pain] 1980 Aug; 9 (1), pp. 55-61.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: English
Journal Info: Country of Publication: NETHERLANDS NLM ID: 7508686 ISSN: 0304-3959
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Pain, Intractable/*therapy

Electric Stimulation Therapy. Endorphins/cerebrospinal fluid. Female. Human. Male.
Abstract: Seventy-two patients suffering from chronic pain were treated with high frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (hi-TNS). Significant predictors for a positive result were pains of neurogenic origin and pains located mainly in the extremities. CSF endorphin levels were determined for 22 patients with organic pain and the group with positive results from the treatment had somewhat (but not significantly) lower levels of fraction I endorphins. Age, sex or reported severity of pain had no predictive value.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
Revision Date: 20001218
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19801216 Date Completed: 19801216
Citation ID(s): PMID: 6968425 Medline UI: 81031711
Database: MEDLINE


Record: 48
Title: [Acupuncture-analgesia/anesthesia: placebo for physician and patient?]
Transliterated Title: Akupunktur-Analgesie/Anästhesie: Placebo für Arzt und Patient?
Author(s): Schaer H
Source: Schweizerische medizinische Wochenschrift. Journal suisse de medecine [Schweiz Med Wochenschr] 1979 Jun 9; 109 (23), pp. 865-9.
Pub. Type: Journal Article
Language: German
Journal Info: Country of Publication: SWITZERLAND NLM ID: 0404401 ISSN: 0036-7672
Citation Subsets: IM
MeSH Heading: Acupuncture Therapy*
Analgesia*

China. Electric Stimulation Therapy. Endorphins/physiology. English Abstract. Europe. Human. Nitrous Oxide/pharmacology.
Abstract: Various non-pharmacological analgesic procedures are attracting interest as a means of treating chronic pain (acupuncture, transcutaneous nerve stimulation, dorsal column stimulation, subcortical stimulation). The gate-control theory and activation of endorphin mechanisms are discussed as explanatory hypotheses for the analgesic effect. The proof of analgesic action in addition to the ever-present placebo effect is difficult. However, in unconscious, superficially anesthetized patients undergoing hysterectomy an analgesic effect of electrostimulation has been demonstrated which resulted in a significant reduction in the need for additional anesthetics. Speculation regarding the future of this method is premature in view of many unanswered questions.
CAS Registry No.: 0 (Endorphins)
10024-97-2 (Nitrous Oxide)
Revision Date: 20011102
Entry Date(s): Date Created: 19790816 Date Completed: 19790816
Citation ID(s): PMID: 313075 Medline UI: 79203099